Let’s face it: you don’t need to be dripping in jewels or sipping from your finest china during your move. You’ll more likely be dripping in sweat and sipping from a water (or beer) bottle. So why not keep your valuables safe and out of the way in the meantime? There’ll be plenty of time for flashing your fancy stuff to the neighbours later on (take that, Dave and Linda).

Learn how to prepare your jewellery, china and silverware for storage so they don’t lose their shine (and their value) before you need them again.


How to Store Jewellery

Dog wearing necklace

Give Them a Clean

Before you place your jewellery in storage, you’ll want to remove any tarnish build-up and make your pieces sparkle. Whether you take them to be professionally cleaned or use a jewellery cleaner or DIY baking soda and detergent concoction at home, it doesn’t take much to have your pieces shining bright like a diamond (or a sapphire… or a ruby… whatever you’re into).

Keep Them Away from Each Other

If you think cats and dogs go at it, just wait until you see a locket and a cocktail ring together in the same pouch. But seriously, keeping your jewellery together can cause rubbing and scratching. Isolate your pieces using acid-free tissue paper, untreated cotton, or raw silk.

Top tip: You can get acid-free tissue paper from your local arts supply store or OfficeMax, and you can find untreated cotton and raw silk from fabric stores like this one.

Use a Board or Cushion

Earrings, brooches and pins can be stuck into a board or cushion then placed in a soft, padded bag.

Hang Chains on Hooks

Avoid knots and tangles by hanging necklaces and chains on wooden or fabric-covered hooks, or storing them in the box they came in.

Avoid Chemicals

Chemically treated and acidic materials such as plastic, cardboard, paper and some types of wood can tarnish metal over time. Stick to acid-free tissue paper and non-chemically treated bags or containers.

Keep It Cool

Sunlight, heat and humidity can all cause damage to jewellery over time. Excessive heat can even cause some metals and stones to change colour. Store your jewellery in a cool, dry place to avoid damage.


How to Store Silverware

Dog holding silverware

Polish Them

Your silverware, not your fingernails. Get your silverware nice and clean using a silver cleaner or a natural at-home recipe. Make sure they’re completely dry before wrapping them for storage.

Use Silver Cloth

Wrap your silverware items separately in tarnish-proof or silver cloth. This will help protect them from knocks and bumps.

Hint: You can find affordable tarnish-proof cloth for your silverware on eBay.

Keep the Air Out

Exposure to air can lead to tarnishing, so store your silverware in airtight bags to keep them protected.

Avoid Chemicals

Plastic bags, rubber bands, foil, wood and newspaper can all cause staining and damage. Avoid these items and other chemically treated materials.

Stay Dark and Dry

Exposure to sunlight and humidity can cause tarnishing, so opt for a climate-controlled storage unit to keep your silverware in top condition.


How to Store China

Puppy in teacup

Wrap It Up

Be sure to wrap each item separately in bubble wrap or packing paper to avoid chips and cracks. You can use foam or felt sheets between each item when stacking.

Stack Things on Their Side

Plates, saucers and bowls should be stacked on their side, not in a pile. The edges of plates are stronger than the centre, so this will further reduce the risk of breakage.

Keep Stacks Small

The more items you have in one box or container, the more likely they are to bump and knock around. Keeping stacks small will also ensure you can comfortably lift boxes of china without any drops. Fill excess space with packing paper or bubble wrap to avoid movement.

Get Labelling

Label your boxes so you know what you’re reaching for and don’t have to unwrap everything and risk damage to find what you’re looking for.


Now keep your furniture safe during storage with these tips, because goodness knows your couch isn’t going to clean itself (darn lazy couch).